Interview: Becky Hart

22473289_1537844329606857_868911733_o.jpg

Becky Hart has a love for fashion and design. I was lucky enough to interview Becky about her fashion and career plans.

Hello! Thank you so much for letting me interview you. How are you?

Very well thank you and very honoured to do this interview!

Tell us a little bit about your background.

Well I like to say I'm a Brighton girl, but I'm actually from a seaside town outside of Brighton where there is a coffee shop or hairdressers on every corner. Having said that we have Beachy Head right round the corner and an endless supply of charity shops and lovely antique jewellers.

Although my town I grew up in is very small, I have been very fortunate that my parents love travel to remote parts of the world. Both of them have explored the world and this yearning to travel has definitely been instilled in me and I am planning on exploring Sri Lanka and India in October next next!

I have just graduated from Uni of Gloucestershire in Cheltenham, with a BA in English Language. I absolutely adored my university experience and have fallen in love with this beautiful recency town!

Describe your style.

A mash up of clueless, grease and my mum's outfits from the 80s and 90s!

But that's not to say that I don't love some of the high street styles. As long as it comes in black then I'll embrace the trending embroidered denim, striped trousers and pinafore dresses with open arms.

When did you start getting into fashion?

I was a GAP baby. I'm not sure why I wasn't scouted as model because I had every item. This is probably when I got into fashion, as I had to put my foot down and say 'no more GAP'. This is ironic now as I love GAP jeans!

Where are your favourite places to shop?

French Connection, Olive, Zara, Toast, Joy, Mod Dolly, Monki, Oliver Bonas, Noa Noa, Snoopers Attic and Molly's Vintage in Brighton!

What inspired you to get into vintage fashion?

Old movies like Thelma and Louise! Can't beat a killer denim or leather jacket. As generic as this may sound, my mum has always kept her clothes from her partying days in the 80s and 90s. Therefore, I've always fawned over her ruby red velvet trousers, sequins dresses and Sophia Loren style hats!

Do you think it is an important aspect to make your own clothing?

If you are talented and patient enough to do it then I tip my hat off to you! I have picked up a sewing needle maybe twice in my life and failed both times. My best friend and I are big advocates for the slow fashion movement, as the impact on social and ecological environment is increasing everyday. I don't agree with shaming people for their choice in clothing brands as I am guilty for still shopping at 'fast fashion brand's however I feel people need to be more aware of the impact it has and what other alternatives are available!

Do you have any tips for anyone shopping in vintage and charity shops?

If you don't have a 'game plan' in your mind, then you won't succeed. You'll be lost in a maze of paisley print and leather skirts. I have 3 items in mind that I feel would re-vamp my wardrobe and I set out to find only these pieces!

Why do you think charity shops are an important place to shop for clothes?

Absolutely and not just for the moral satisfaction. It breaks up the usual trends that you may find in your wardrobe and sometimes you can find pieces that should've cost a bomb.

I also feel that by shopping at charity shops, you're joining a culture that is open and experimental. But it's good to not just purchase but also donate, charity shops are desperate for new styles!

Your style is very unique and wonderful; how do you go about styling different clothes?

Three things my mum taught me:

1) Colour coordination is the secret to looking like you've planned an outfit even if you've just thrown in on.

2) Dress for your shape. 

3) Make sure you love what you wear and you feel comfortable- there's nothing worse than feeling self conscious in a dress!

These 3 things are something I keep in mind when I style outfits, for instance I have a curvy figure with a small waist so should flaunt it with skater and a line pieces. However, my legs are not my favourite asset therefore I wear dresses & skirts that are only just above the knee. I used to think that being 5ft 3 meant that I shouldn't wear pleated midi skirts but they're a blessing in disguise because I don't have to worry about my legs!

Have you always been into fashion?

Probably since I could say the word dungarees!

What new pieces have you picked up for this Autumn and Winter, that we haven't seen on your Instagram yet?

A lovely chord pinafore in a raspberry colour and a chunky mustard knit jumper! As soon as I've picked up some some grey mom jeans then you'll definitely see the mustard outfit appearing!

What are some of your current fashion obsessions?

1) Embroidered boots

2) Red coats

3) Glitter socks

4) Victorian collars

It just screams winter parties!

What are your favourite pieces of clothing?

My turquoise wool coat that I found in a charity shop for £5 for winter and for summer my Linen navy striped trousers from TOAST.

What could you not live without?

My mum's gold earrings that she gave to me! They make every outfit look fun!

Do you have any career plans?

Aspirations would to be a food critic, travelling the world trying and cooking new dishes. But in reality, I can't leave the university life behind therefore I'm pursuing a career in digital engagement within a University.

Do you have a favourite fashion magazine?

The Gentlewoman - the photography is outstanding.

Who was your first style icon?

My love of black and a bold red lip definitely comes from Grease, or perhaps my Mum!

Sophia Loren inspired my vintage-looking outfits.

But Alexa Chung is a fabulous icon for utility and layering!

Why has social media been an important platform for you to use?

Social media is a brilliant platform for expressing ourselves, whether that be for personal, professional or public purposes. I was fortunate enough to do a social media internship for my university, where I managed the platforms for my course. It was a brilliant opportunity for building my career within digital education!

Outside of the professional environment, social media helped me accept and realise that there are 7.6 billion people on this world, meaning there are 7.6 billion individual body shapes. I'm slowly starting to learn that we are blessed with the skin we live in, so we need to own it!

What do we hope to see in this up and coming year for your Instagram?

More travel pictures as I'm a sucker for taking short city breaks and hopefully this time next year you'll see pictures of Sri Lanka!

However, I don't think I'll be able to pack anything in my backpack but practical walking shoes.

Do you have any advice for anyone who would like to set up their own Instagram?

Find a niche that works for you whether that be travel, fashion, food or all three! Start small and aim big and most importantly be real to yourself in what you post.

What's the best piece of creative advice you've ever been given?

Art is subjective. What one person loves, another may not but this doesn't mean there's anything 'wrong' with it!

You can follow this lovely lady on her LinkedIn ‘https://www.linkedin.com/in/rebecca-hart-786289139’. She has also provided some inspiring links, which are ‘https://www.notjustalabel.com’ and ‘http://guiltyfeminist.com’. 

Rhiannon BrittenComment